buy strattera online - buy doxycycline online - buy prozac online - buy synthroid online - buy prozac - buy synthroid - buy cytotec online

Author Archive

Mohamed Hassan FIAS named to the Pontifical Academy

Written by admin on . Posted in News

3 July 2018

For a career of accomplishments in research and international cooperation, TWAS founding Executive Director Mohamed Hassan has been elected a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

Mohamed H.A. Hassan FIAS, the President of the Sudanese National Academy of Sciences and former Executive Director of The World Academy of Sciences, has been appointed by Pope Francis to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

Mohamed H.A. Hassan, chairman of the Governing Council of the United Nations Technology Bank for the Least Developed Countries, was notified of this lifetime appointment by Bishop Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Academy. He will receive the insignia in an official induction ceremony, which will be celebrated during a solemn pontifical audience at a meeting of the Academy 12-14 November in Rome, Italy.

The Pontifical Academy is one of the world’s oldest and most august scientific bodies, with roots dating to the early 17th century. Under Academy statutes, members receive lifetime appointments “on the basis of their eminent original scientific studies and of their acknowledged moral personality, without any ethnical or religious discrimination.”

“I am humbled and privileged to be appointed a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, one of the world’s most prestigious academies,” Hassan said. “I look forward to joining the Academy’s 80 international members and contributing to the fulfilment of its mission – the advance of knowledge in science and in related ethical and philosophical issues.”

Hassan served as TWAS’s first executive director, a position he held from 1983-2011. During that period, he guided the Academy through a period of great growth and expanding influence. In the global scientific community, he has a reputation as an ambassador for scientific excellence and international science cooperation.

Using his experience and diplomatic skills, Hassan has been an advocate of scientific advancement for the developing world, and a driving force in establishing South-South and South-North partnerships for sustainable development. He has also fostered the organization of science diplomacy events, bringing together scientists and policymakers to address the challenges of poverty, scientific development and gender equality.

With a PhD in mathematics from the University of Oxford (UK), Hassan’s scientific contributions range from theoretical plasma physics to the development of mathematical and physical models in environmental, geoscience and space science. He has also authored articles on science, technology and innovation in the developing world. In addition to his leadership at the Sudanese National Academy of Sciences[link: snas.org.sd], Hassan currently he is a professor of mathematics at Khartoum University and chairman of the Board of Trustees of Al Mashreq University, both in Sudan.

He formerly served as president of the African Academy of Sciences and is a current member of several merit-based international academies. In 2012 he received the Abdus Salam Medal, named after TWAS founder Abdus Salam, the Pakistani physicist and Nobel Prize winner.

Indeed, the election of Hassan to the Pontifical Academy has important symbolic significance. It was at a meeting of the Academy in 1981 that Salam and other scholars conceived of an academy of sciences for the developing world – and from that idea, TWAS was born in 1983. Salam was a member before his death in 1996.

The Pontifical Academy (Pontificia Academia Scientiarum in Latin) is an international and independent body with roots that date back to the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (Academy of the Lynxes), an esteemed scientific body founded in Rome (1603).

Today the Academy’s goals are focused on promoting the progress of mathematical, physical and natural sciences, fostering interaction between faith and reason and offering authoritative advice on scientific and technological matters. Academy statutes limit membership to 80 elite academicians, all serving lifetime terms. They represent all the principal branches of science and all regions of the world.

The academicians are expected to attend Academy meetings, and to suggest topics for study. They help to select new members, and also to nominate exceptional early career scientists for the Pius XI Medal.

The Pontifical Academy is a member of the InterAcademy Partnership (IAP), which is hosted by TWAS in Trieste, Italy, and of the International Science Council (ICSU).

International Statement on Dementia from IAP for Health

Written by admin on . Posted in News

نتيجة بحث الصور عن ‪iap health‬‏

IAP Statement: “A Call for Action to Tackle the Growing Burden of Dementia”

Release Date: 5 July 2018; 00:01 CET
Contact: Peter McGrath
IAP Coordinator, Trieste, Italy
Email: [email protected], [email protected]
Tel: +39 040 2240 571; +39 040 2240 681

 

Howard Chertkow, MD, FRCP, FCAHS
Professor of Neurology, McGill University;
Scientific Director, Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration in Aging (CCNA), Jewish General Hospital, Lady Davis Research Institute
3755, chemin de la Côte-Ste-Catherine, Bureau F-408
Montréal (Québec) H3T 1E2
Email: [email protected]
Tel: +1 514 340 8222

Trieste, Italy, 5 July 2018
The InterAcademy Partnership for Health (IAP for Health) today issues ‘A Call for Action to Tackle the Growing Burden of Dementia’. This IAP Statement is endorsed by more than 50 members of IAP for Health (i.e. academies of medicine and academies of science with strong medical sections from around the world).

In the Statement, IAP highlights the fact that, worldwide, the proportion of the population that is 65 years of age or greater has grown over the last decades, and this trend will continue. Also, because advancing age is the greatest known risk factor for dementia, the number of individuals living with dementia worldwide will nearly triple by 2050. Most of this increase – from 47.5 million people to some 135.5 million – will occur among people living in low- and middle-income countries.

A mixture of brain diseases often underlies dementia, with many people showing changes consistent with both Alzheimer’s disease (the most common form of dementia) and cerebrovascular disease. But while we are learning more about the risk factors commonly associated with dementia (e.g. smoking and diabetes that are linked with stroke and heart disease), dementia continues to be a slowly progressive illness where the diagnosis is made after the process has been present for years.In addition, while young onset (under 60 years) dementia is rare in many countries, this may not be the case where HIV/AIDS is prevalent, such as in sub-Saharan Africa and other low-income countries. Thus young people in such countries may bear a disproportionately greater burden of dementia in years to come.

Dementia also does not affect men and women equally. Women are at both greater risk of developing dementia and then living longer with the condition. Women also provide most of the informal (unpaid) care for people living with dementia.
The IAP for Health Statement, therefore, specifically calls on governments and other healthcare providers to implement a number of practices, including:
• Increasing awareness by educating the public about dementia, how to maintain brain health, and on accepting people with dementia as they are, accommodating to their remaining abilities;
• Supporting research to find and implement effective approaches (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological) to delay, prevent, slow-down, treat, ameliorate, and eventually cure the common causes of dementia;
• Investing in national healthcare systems, including both training a sufficient number and mix of providers as well as building the necessary infrastructure to ensure timely, competent person-centered care is available to those living with dementia and their caregivers through all stages of the illness.
“Our Call for Action is one which aims at developing an evidence-based and a public health orientated approach to this looming problem,” explains Howard Chertkow, chair of the IAP for Health working group that prepared the Statement. “Ultimately each country should make a clear assessment for each population of the potential for primary or upstream prevention of dementia. This should be followed by plans for secondary prevention, i.e. early detection followed by effective treatment, which is considered to be more effective at that stage than later. Such treatment would include both what is currently available and what should soon be developed through therapeutic trials. So-called tertiary prevention (mitigation of dementia and its ramifications through various therapies and end of life care for those with dementia) also needs to be ramped up.”

Depei Liu of the Chinese Academy of Engineering and co-chair of IAP for Health, says: “The growing issue of dementia is affecting all countries, whether they are developed or developing. By releasing this Statement, we hope that IAP for Health and its member academies, representing the global medical science community, will be able to raise awareness of what needs to be done to get ahead of the curve. We expect that our member academies will now present it directly to their national governments and disseminate it through their national scientific and medical networks so that our recommendations can begin to be implemented. I especially call on low- and middle-income countries to do all they can to respond to this burgeoning crisis.”

IAP for Health’s other co-chair, Detlev Ganten of the German National Academy of Sciences, Leopoldina, added: “Like all IAP Statements, this Statement on dementia has been thoroughly reviewed. It presents – based on the latest evidence from our member academies – the best impartial advice to policy-makers in national ministries of health and social welfare, to healthcare agencies and other relevant institutions, and to decision-makers at the international level. The burden of dementia is growing, especially in countries with an ageing society, and it is time to take action.”

 

 The Statement is available at:

http://www.interacademies.org/45731/IAP-for-Health-A-call -for-action-to-tackle-the-growing-burden-of-dementia

Prof. Malik Maaza awarded the 2018 José Vasconcelos World Award of Education

Written by admin on . Posted in News

The award acknowledges Professor Mâaza’s work in promoting education for societal development and sustainability, and recognises his international and humanistic approach to science education as well as his commitment to training and mentoring young scientists on the African continent. To this end, Professor Mâaza has worked tirelessly to raise funds worldwide in support of researchers from less affluent countries. He has helped scientists from war zones in Africa and the Middle East pursue their research and has organised periodic exchanges between renowned scientists of Israeli and Arabic origin, seeking to build bridges through science.

 

Achievements

Professor Malik Mâaza is an African physicist and an accomplished researcher and educator, born in Algeria in 1963 and working in South Africa. His clear vision of how science can be used as a tool to empower individuals to address some of humanity’s most pressing challenges has been demonstrated through his commitment to training and mentoring young scientists.

He is greatly respected for his work as a pioneer of nanoscience and nanotechnology on the African continent and, most importantly, for his accomplishments as an outstanding educator and dedicated mentor. He has significantly contributed to the education of numerous PhD students and postdoctoral researchers.

He has also played a crucial part in keeping South Africa at the leading edge of international research. In this sense, he plays a key strategic planning role in developing South African research programmes and research grant proposals. His work has earned him international recognition from UNESCO, which appointed him to the first South-South Chair in Nanosciences & Nanotechnology: the UNESCO UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences and Nanotechnology, also known as U2ACN2.

Recognised by the global scientific community for the value of his published work through frequent invitations to speak at international events, he acts as an ambassador and voice for the African continent in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology.

Professor Mâaza’s contributions in the area of education are not confined to the classroom. He has created platforms for the introduction of emerging areas of education like materials science, space sciences and laser sciences. The many new facilities that he has set up underpin a range of scientific programmes, while he has established his own team and exploited his own expertise and ideas to build stronger relations with both academia and industry at national and international level.

His dedication to the cause of women in science is seen through his role as a member of the international as well as the Sub-Saharan juries of the L’Oréal-UNESCO Award for Women in Science. He is a major player in promoting the role of women in science, especially those living in low and medium income countries. He is also a peace activist, using science as a powerful path for fostering human relations between young researchers.

His work as UNESCO Chair has had a huge impact on building capacities among the future generation of African scientists.

 

World cultural Council, News
Announcement of 2018 Winners
June 4, 2018

 

Building Humanity’s Common Future

Written by admin on . Posted in News

 

 

HRH Prince El Hassan bin Talal

Published at 11:47 PM October 28, 2017

 

The Islamic world must invest in science, technology, and innovation

Politics rather than policy is clouding the biosphere of most countries in the Islamic world. Science policy in the Arab region is not stable due to instability of the region.

The question is how the 2030 agenda for sustainable development (UN-SDGS), can pave the way for global peace and prosperity with such political instability. Does stability come with policies in science, technology, and innovation (STI) to create the “niche” of political stability that the Islamic world has hardly enjoyed?

There are areas where some countries in the Islamic world has succeeded in providing political stability with sound policies, and has created a stable democratic governance with change and continuity, and emerged strongly in STI and economy.

Malaysia is a country which has succeeded in generating wealth per capita to overcome unemployment and poverty and to compete with OECD countries and has developed a unique democratic system with full participation of all segments of the society based on tolerance, equity, and justice.

They have created a sustainable political system leaving no one behind with sound policies in economics, science, technology, and innovation (STI), generating high-tech exports dependent heavily on the R&D and technology transfer. This is a model which could be studied carefully for prosperous and future progress of the Islamic Umma.

The Islamic world cannot live on the glories of the past, although we have to underline the success stories in our history to give us the impetus to trigger with vigour the development of our present and future quality of life and put human dignity, at the centre of development.

The Islamic world faces problems in knowledge-use more than in knowledge creation. Without translating academic research into policy and public awareness, research will be read by few people who constitute the elites who are disconnected from the masses of the society.

The Islamic world cannot live on the glories of the past, although we have to underline the success stories in our history to give us the impetus to trigger with vigour the development of our present

There is a gap between scientists and policy/decision makers. Universities are the centres of creating knowledge and its transmission, and where minds are shaped. The creation of knowledge occurs through research, free-thinking, exploration, and the exchange and debate of ideas.

The transmission of knowledge is done by teaching and training of the next generation, which not only receives the distilled, confirmed facts and theories in various branches of knowledge, but also learns to dissect them, check for any flaws, and construct more robust frameworks of knowledge for the world.

In addition to the knowledge production and scholarship and the shaping of critical and creative minds, one of the main goals and raisons d’être of universities worldwide is to develop within society a culture of inquiry, intellectual rigour, and promotion of evidence and merit.

This spirit is what led to the Islamic Golden Age of science. Indeed, the Muslim world is widely credited for having established the first universities in the world, going back as far as 859 AD.

And indeed, those universities created knowledge by translating books from scholars of previous civilisations, by hosting scholars and giving them the means and the freedom to explore all the ideas that they wished to analyse, and by training students and disciples in intellectual work, from the purely philosophical, theological, or theoretical, to the most directly applicable techniques.

However, after a Golden Age of knowledge and science that lasted many centuries, the Islamic world went through a long period of decline, which was followed by Western colonisation, and by the 20th century, it was trailing all other nations in knowledge production and dissemination.

Today, and after huge efforts (financial and otherwise), only a few universities from the Arab world can be found in the Top 400 of the major world university rankings, and none in the Top 100.

New knowledge, particularly knowledge related to technology, drives the economic systems. Economic agents, including firms and governments, are forced to adapt to technical change in order to survive in a competitive environment.

While governments should act as facilitator, technology capabilities must accumulate in enterprises.

This will only be possible if we strengthen our universities and R&D organisations and create effective linkages between them and industry. It will be the increasing use of knowledge in the production processes and service industry which will determine the growth of our GDP.

Our ability to compete or survive in the globalisation of economic systems depends on our commitment towards the development of our human capital and ensuring a continuous learning process within the government institutions and enterprises to create a culture of innovation.

Innovation is concerned with enhancing national productivity and national competitive performance.

Dynamic innovation systems involve interplay between a number of different parts of the society which include the government, private sector, universities, and research institutions.

The transition of our economy from an agriculture-based economy to a knowledge-based economy involves a mosaic of complex interactions in which a large number of players would be involved.

The universities will need to play a central part in this transition through knowledge creation, its use and diffusion of new knowledge into the society through establishment of technology parks, business incubators, access to venture capital, and other such schemes.

The new world order requires us to prepare our children to face the challenges of the global economy.

This involves a substantially different type of education to be imparted, focused not only on the mastery of subject matters but also on the development of the various other skills such as the ability to think critically, innovate, communicate effectively, work effectively in teams, develop entrepreneurship and risk-taking skills, and the ability to face and manage changes in a flexible manner.

This would require a massive focused national effort.

I have no doubts that the cross-fertilisation of ideas coming out from this conference will enhance our ability to pursue the development of the quality of life for the Umma.

HRH Prince El Hassan Bin Talal is former crown prince of Jordan. This article is an abridged version of an address delivered at the 21st Science Conference of the Islamic World Academy of Sciences held in Konya, Turkey, October 7, 2017. 

 

Source: http://www.dhakatribune.com/opinion/op-ed/2017/10/28/building-humanitys-common-future/

IAS 2012 Symposium Proceedings Online

Written by admin on . Posted in News

IAS 2012 Conference Proceedings has  recently been uploaded onto the IAS website <www.iasworld.org> under the section Recent Publications or directly http://www.iasworld.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Astana-Contents-Final.pdf

Proceedings of the IAS Symposium on

 “SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN THE MUSLIM
WORLD: ACHIEVEMENTS AND PROSPECTS
,”

organised in Astana/ Kazakhstan;

22-23 May 2012